jeudi 8 novembre 2007

NO!



One of the least democratic international body, if not the least, is the EU. The last thing the governments will do is ask the people they're supposed to represent to have a say in any matter.

To an overwhelming majority -and I mean overwhelming!- the whole European business is double Dutch. How does it work? who decides? in whose interest? and overall, who pays and how much? are questions 95% of Europeans couldn't give a shadow of an answer.

But there is one topic that is even farther off people's knowledge and decision and it is the question of membership.

The Baltic States have been admitted some years ago as well as Cyprus and Malta. No big deal. More recently Poland, Romania and Bulgaria have been granted membership. What these countries have brought to the 20 odd others I still can't figure. But the Italians begin to have an idea about it.

But when it becomes tragic is when Turkey is demanding its admission! They so insist on being granted membership that you'd think they really love Italian music, German poetry, French architecture, Spanish theatre (especially the XVIIth century one) and British crockery so as to melt into a European ocean of cultural wealth and mutual admiration.

Or is it because of the hundreds billions Euros they would get from France, Germany, the Netherland, Italy etc? And I don't even mention the cultural/religious values chasm that exists between mainland Europe and a country bordering Iraq, Syria and Iran.

But wait! Georgia is also asking for membership as well as Ukraine. You bet! And since we're at it, what about considering Afghanistan and also all the former Russian regions of the south as potential receivers of the European cash delivery system?

What 75 million Turks could bring to the other 350 million Europeans, I have no idea. What they can expect to get I can figure out.

Historically the EU was meant to be an enduring link between the former WWII enemies, particularly France and Germany. And it worked. But it has now grown completely out of control and is globally detrimental to the founding members.

It's high time to put a halt to this madness and say to the Turks a polite but definitive: NO!

8 commentaires:

LASunsett a dit…

Hi Flocon,

//Historically the EU was meant to be an enduring link between the former WWII enemies, particularly France and Germany. And it worked. But it has now grown completely out of control and is globally detrimental to the founding members.//

The same thing can be said about the current argument that is going on here in the US. How many immigrants can we absorb in such a short amount of time? When is enough, enough?

These cases are a little different, for sure. But the premise is still the same: Getting a slice of the pie. That's what the other less privileged nations want from the EU. That's what immigrants want from the US.

It's not quite as endearing when it's your wallet they want into, is it?

Mustang a dit…

I agree that the EU is one of the “least democratic” bodies, but given the extra-national basis of the European Union, I cannot imagine any organization that would work as efficiently. As an organization, it appears as a massive parliamentary structure — suggesting “limited” democratic representation. To my knowledge, from the earliest days of the European Economic Community, there has never been any suggestion of representative democracy outside the framework of national referenda. It would seem, therefore, that the only guarantee a citizen of your country has vis-à-vis the EU representing your interests, is a thorough vetting of political candidates within the national framework. And of course, this is the “hard part” of democratic action.

I am finding a number of Europeans who are not in favor of extending membership to Turkey, and the IHT article you linked to explains why. Western Europe is experiencing an invasion of émigrés from non-western nations. It would seem that they are motivated for essentially two reasons: (1) the “free” services typical of socialist structures, and (2) as part of a campaign to dominate western politics so that, through democratic processes, Islamacists can in the future impose Shar’ia law. They have already started doing this within their ever-widening Muslim enclaves in France, Germany, and Denmark.

Unless or until EU members begin to redevelop a sense of “nationalism,” the invasion will continue until there is only “Francistan” in the place of a once marvelous example of Western Civilization.

This is an excellent article.

Flocon a dit…

Hi LA,
"These cases are a little different" and right you are. America being first and foremost a land of immigration contrary to Europe with 2000 years of national identity in many countries, the issue doesn't follow exactly the same pattern. But on the whole we read the same page here.

One of my favourite quotes:

"He that has the confidence to turn his wishes into demands, will be but a little way from thinking he ought to obtain them."

John Locke
(Some thoughts concerning education; §107)
Think immigrants or any other group or person resorting to blackmail to see their demands be met.

Greg a dit…

If I were European, I would be against the EU in any size. But definitely, the bigger it is, the less it will be able to attend to the needs of most Europeans. Europeans have a hard enough time getting their national gov'ts to listen to them.

Serious question, though: should Americans care either way? I can't figure out how the EU expanding (or even its mere existence) affects my life....

Flocon a dit…

Hi Mustang and welcome.
Western Europe is experiencing an invasion of émigrés from non-western nations.

We should pay attention not to confuse the situation even more than what it is.
Can Poland, Romania and Bulgaria be considered as non western nations? They all have 1500 years of christianity "behind" them.

Now, regarding Turkey that's a horse of a different colour. This country has been a steady American ally in the region since the end of WWII. Yet, you seem unconfortable with the idea of Turks entering the EU, contrary to the wishes expressed several times by Pdt Bush.

I can't agree with you on your second paragraph which shows a concern that obviously is more an American one than an European one.
Yet Europeans are closer to Middle East and the dangers of "islamofascists". Do you really believe Europeans are blind to the danger of terrorism?

Regarding the threat posed by "ever-widening Muslim enclaves" whose ultimate goal would be to impose the shar'ia on western countries, there's some sort of exageration here.

Thanks for passing by and commenting Mustang

Flocon a dit…

Hi Greg

"I can't figure out how the EU expanding (or even its mere existence) affects my life..."
That's what more and more Europeans are asking themselves.
Save for the ones who get the money. French peasants or Polish ones..., Spaniards and Irish companies.
All those on the receiving end sort of ask for more. Now, that comes as a surprise doesn'it?

Mustang a dit…

Actually, I intended my use of the term émigrés to address the migration of people to Europe, not of European nations seeking admission to the EU. My knowledge is limited to reading, corresponding or speaking with Europeans who are invariably concerned about increasing Muslim populations, and by the fact that in some countries, Muslim neighborhoods have become dangerous to non-Muslims. In particular, Denmark is experiencing a situation where Islamist thugs demand the institution of Shar’ia law and in that process, deny free speech in these enclaves by citizens and elected officials. You are correct in observing that this may be an entirely American perspective — and not even a common one — but on the other hand, does any free society want to return to the days of the “brown shirts?”

I do not believe that Europeans are blind to the dangers of terrorism, but I am assured by Europeans that many of your politicians are living in complete denial about such dangers, even to the extent of ignoring the very existence of increasingly troublesome social trends.

In any event, my visit to your site (and others) is to learn, not to preach. Thank you for allowing me to stop by. I shall return.

Flocon a dit…

Mustang
I am assured by Europeans that many of your politicians are living in complete denial about such dangers, even to the extent of ignoring the very existence of increasingly troublesome social trends.

By and large Europeans trust their politicians like Americans trust them I guess: not much.
But it may be a good policy not to seem to raise the alarm on a daily basis about the possible threat of Muslim terrorism in countries where the Muslim population accounts for 5 to 10% of the population.
I don't know the Danish situation but in France, Great Britain, Spain, Italy or Germany where millions of Muslims live, the potential "terrorists" are just a handfull, that is 99,9999% of the Muslims are here to make a living, period. No need to stir them up.
I'm not sure politicians are in denial but they let the intelligence and secret services do their job.

Thanks again for posting. I don't write often in English, the last time was one month ago.
http://tinyurl.com/2vbjsu
I've seen your well written and argumented blog. You know better than me how writing a daily post can be demanding and time consuming. So imagine writing in another language...
Anyway, I'll try to post another one in English rather soon.